Introit for Third Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year B)

In Years A and B for the third Sunday in Ordinary Time, the Introit is Dominus secus mare Galilaéae rather than Adorate Deum, the option for Year C and The Third Sunday after Epiphany. This Introit is highly unusual in that it employs a Gospel text rather than a Psalm. It is even more uncommon that this text from Matthew’s Gospel sung at the beginning of Mass will then be heard again when recited by the celebrant at the Gospel (this time from Mark), and for a third time (naturally) at Communion.

“The Lord walking by the sea of Galilee, saw two brothers, Peter and Andrew, and he called out to them: “Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men.”

This unique Introit cannot be found anywhere in the Liber Usualis. In the Graduale Triplex, it is documented from the Einsiedeln manuscript which was begun in the 11th Century and is believed to the oldest most complete Missal of Gregorian Chant in existence. So where has it come from?

UPDATE – Good old Stan Metheny has answered my question. It comes from the Mass formulary of the Vigil of St Andrew the Apostle (29th November) in the older (1961) graduale.  (I don’t have one of those…)   Stan writes:

The melody moves along at a steady narrative pace, through the ornamentation over duos fratres and vos… piscatores, evoke images of fisherman raising and lowering their nets out of the water. 

See the rest of Stan’s analysis on the Communion Antiphon in the comments box.

 

Click HERE for the organ accompaniment. (From Corpus Christi Watershed.)

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2 thoughts on “Introit for Third Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year B)

  1. Stan Metheny says:

    Clare, these two brief extracts from my comments to the schola for this Sunday’s Introit & Communion antiphons may be of interest. While the psalms do supply the bulk of the texts in the Graduale, gospel texts there are not so rare as one might think.

    Like last Sunday’s Communion antiphon, today’s Introit comes from the Mass formulary of the Vigil of St Andrew the Apostle (29 November) in the older (1961) Graduale. It is Matthew’s telling of the call of Andrew and Peter, sung because we hear Mark’s version in today’s Gospel. (Last week we heard John’s version.) It is in the first mode, which can be declarative, somewhat like the eighth. The melody moves along at a steady narrative pace, though the ornamentation over duos fratres and vos . . . piscatores evoke images of fisherman raising and lowering their nets out of the water.

    Again reflecting the Gospel pericope, today’s Communion antiphon comes from Mass formulary for the Feast of St Andrew as found in both the former and the current Graduale. The text, which includes a reference to a later passage in Matthew’s gospel (16:24), is a reminder that following the call of Jesus will involve sacrifice. For Andrew and Peter, giving up their boat and nets is just the first sacrifice of many; they are destined for a cross of their own. Similar to last Sunday, Mode 8 again stresses the immediate confidence they placed in Jesus, and the melody beginning immediately on the dominant adds emphasis to this. Its continuance on the dominant indicates for us their enduring faith, despite the sacrifice involved. The first phrase is the more quiet, although there is a certain solemnity in the twofold descent of the interval sol-re and the ascending sol-do, which is, as we had in the Introit, a melodic allusion to the lowering and raises of the fishermen’s nets into the sea. Dom Johner calls the Communion antiphons of last Sunday and this ‘as fresh as the breeze of the sea . . . true gems of the Graduale.’

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